Wicklow Roots

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Re: Wicklow Roots

Post by Sinead » Mon Aug 31, 2015 10:49 pm

I have friends living in Clonegal, she is from Dun Laoghaire and he from Inchicore!
Spent a few days with them earlier in the year. There is a great village attitude
and friendship there, they all work hard with the Tidy Towns. A nice place but
a bit too far down the country for me.

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Re: Wicklow Roots

Post by Snowhite » Tue Sep 01, 2015 12:01 am

skins wrote:Rocker,

Daughter was married in Avoca on Thursday, like her Ma and Da, with the reception afterwards in Rathsallagh House, Dunlavin. A beautiful place and a great day. But being up in the Gap in a heavy downpour is a bit unsettling, the headlines keep popping up in your head...."Father of Bride Found at Bottom of Steep Ravine"! Would you believe I've never been that far into West Wicklow before? Wicklow is really like two or more counties, with the mountains acting as a divider between them, and up around Carnew would have more in common with North Wexford and Carlow than Wicklow itself. Some people reckon it's part of the reason why the county can't put together a decent Senior Football team in the All-Ireland championship....there's no unity amongst the different regions. When we were going to school, as Denis and Jabra will remember, the Bray lads were very quick to tell you that they were "Wickla", nowadays Bray seems to be just another suburb full of plastic Dubs.

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My son built his house about 10 mins away from Rathsallagh House, such a beautiful place for a wedding reception. I love going over the gap to his house it's just such great scenery, funny how my ancestors came from Rathnew/Rathdrum area and now 2 of my son's live in Wicklow, one is just outside Wicklow Town and the other is over the far side in Grangecon, Wicklow :lol: The son in Grangecon and his wife both work in Dun Laoghaire and travel up and down everyday, the other son works in Glasthule. ;) costs them a fortune in petrol :(


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Re: Wicklow Roots

Post by skins » Tue Sep 01, 2015 10:54 am

Yes, Snowy/Sinéad, some of these places are brilliant to live in, but not so nice if you're faced with a long trek to the city on a daily basis, in all kinds of adverse weather conditions. Wicklow Town wouldn't be too bad, with a choice of public transport, but I'd balk a bit at the idea of Grangecon, I think.


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Re: Wicklow Roots

Post by slipper » Wed Sep 02, 2015 10:53 am

skins wrote:Yes, remember them well, Denis. Tommy Campbell was another one, and a chap named McGarry. Do you recall a bloke called Niall O'Neill, who lived at Shanganagh Bridge? Was at a funeral in Clonegal a few months ago; there was a meal afterwards in the Mount Wolseley Hotel, followed by a white-knuckle ride home through thick fog over the hills via Shillelagh, Tinahely, etc. Not for the faint-hearted!
Did Tommy Campbell have a younger brother named Francis ? There was a chap from Bray with that name in my class - I was a year behind you - and he had an older brother in Eblana, wonder if that was Tommy? Anyway this kid caused a sensation in school when at the height of the Davy Crockett craze he showed up in a fringed mock leather jacket and coonskin hat - I think they had relations in the U S - it goes without saying he was the envy of everybody in our class,if not the whole school!



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Re: Wicklow Roots

Post by skins » Wed Sep 02, 2015 11:56 am

Sorry, Slipper, can't remember that, even though I was at a Birthday party in his house on Old Connaught Avenue once.


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Re: Wicklow Roots

Post by Rocker » Fri Dec 15, 2017 4:43 pm

Was in the National Art Gallery this morning at the Frederic William Burton exhibition....class.
details of the man,
http://www.libraryireland.com/irisharti ... burton.php

During his early period he did lots of family portraits all in watercolour...fantastic. One caught my eye,,,painted in 1849 the La Touche family at Bellvue House, Delgany. Peter la Touche, his mother Charlotte Maude, daughter of Cornwallis, first Viscount Hawarden. The blurb attached to each picture was excellent and improved my history and geography no end, I also found out that the la Touche family were Hugenot bankers.

Bit about the La Touche family,
http://homepage.eircom.net/~latouche/History.htm


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Re: Wicklow Roots

Post by Denis Cromie » Tue Dec 19, 2017 5:07 pm

Good info there Rocker. The La Touche Legacy committee are a active group and hold regular seminars down here. I attended one of them and enjoyed it. The La Touche's have a very interesting history and their legacy is highly regarded in Greystones.



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Re: Wicklow Roots

Post by Rocker » Thu Dec 28, 2017 12:38 pm

Wicklow Heritage send me the odd posting and this arrived today,

http://www.countywicklowheritage.org/pa ... ?path=0p2p

Great info on place names.


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Re: Wicklow Roots

Post by Rocker » Tue Jan 02, 2018 6:51 pm

A few years ago I went to Donard and Glendalough searching for family. At one stage one of them worked in Humewood House so I got interested in that. It has had ups and downs and is now called Humewood Castle. The other day I heard a report the tech/cable billionaire John Malone who now owns it has spent 40 million on renovations. Here is a little history on the castle.

http://curiousireland.ie/humewood-castl ... klow-1870/

http://www.buildingsofireland.ie/niah/s ... o=16402701


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Re: Wicklow Roots

Post by Rocker » Sun Jan 07, 2018 11:12 am

This New year period is a great time for meeting relations whom we haven't seen for years. There we are like flotsam and jetsam crowded into every room chatting and getting reacquainted with each other.I'm mad into the family history so started to relate stories I have found out about mutual GtGt Grandfathers and their tough times in Wicklow.

Lo and behold various different relations piped up...I go walking in the Wicklow hills every week.......I go to Glendalough every month....I love doing the lakes at glendalough.... it has to be a tribe thing. None of these had any idea of the others,most had never met before, they never knew our forefathers came from Wicklow...yet each of them felt at home in Wicklow and love every moment they are there.

Scary!!

Now, I'm going to rope some distant relations into the family research...yippee


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Re: Wicklow Roots

Post by Rocker » Fri Mar 09, 2018 10:06 am

It was on Tuesday, March 14th, 2017, around 1am, that the R116 rescue helicopter suddenly went off-radar.

To mark the first-year anniversary of that tragic day, Greystones Coast Guards are holding a short remembrance ceremony on Wednesday, March 14th. Also being remembered on the day is Catriona Lucas, a Coast Guard volunteer who lost her life on September 12th, 2016 whilst on a search with the Doolin/Kilkee unit.


The ceremony kicks off at 7.30pm, with a piper playing at the south end of the pier before 5 flares are released out at sea by the Greystones Coast Guard boat and the RNLI Wicklow ALB. This will be followed by a minute’s silence.
Those attending will then be invited into the Ridge Angling Clubhouse for some refreshments, as the piper bookends the ceremony.

https://www.greystonesguide.ie/sittin-o ... f-the-bay/


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Re: Wicklow Roots

Post by Denis Cromie » Fri Mar 09, 2018 10:15 am

Fair dues Rocker you know what happens in Greystones better than I do. Are you thinking of moving down ?



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Re: Wicklow Roots

Post by Toss » Fri Mar 09, 2018 11:15 pm

Denis Cromie wrote:Fair dues Rocker you know what happens in Greystones better than I do. Are you thinking of moving down ?
Dont think she would have enough coins to keep the ESB meter running down there .... I expect Greystones will be needing more school places in 5 years after the latest blackout ;) :lol:


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Re: Wicklow Roots

Post by Denis Cromie » Sun Mar 11, 2018 1:58 pm

Leave it to ya Toss. :lol: :lol: but I can tell you it'll have nothing to do with me.



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Re: Wicklow Roots

Post by Rocker » Tue Mar 13, 2018 10:45 am

The more you delve into family history and roots the more you realise that we have such entwined lives. While scratching my head about family names in Wicklow and reading up bits and pieces I came across this snippet about the Grove in Glencree and the Glencree Society.

Tie ins with Sallynoggin, Sandycove, Dún Laoghaire...
must spend a Sunday there in the Summer

http://glencreesociety.com/about-us/history/


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Re: Wicklow Roots

Post by Rocker » Mon Apr 16, 2018 9:03 pm

So many famous people came from Wicklow.

Today I heard of a talk in Blessington about Dame Ninette de Valois OM CH DBE (6 June 1898 – 8 March 2001). She was born Edris Stannus and lived the first years of her life in Wicklow. Her father was Lt.-Col. Thomas Robert Alexander Stannus, born on 29 September 1870. He died on 17 July 1917 at age 46, from wounds received in action. He was severely wounded in the Gallipoli campaign. He returned to active service in the autumn of 1916, and was mentioned in despatches and recommended for the D.S.O. and the Legion of Honour.

Ninette de Valois was born as Edris Stannus on 6 June 1898 at Baltyboys House, an 18th-century manor house near the town of Blessington, County Wicklow, Ireland and in 1905 moved to England to live with her grandmother in Kent.

The young Edris Stannus started attending ballet lessons in 1908, at the age of ten, and at the age of thirteen she began her professional training at the Lila Field Academy for Children. It was at this time that she changed her name to Ninette de Valois and made her professional debut as a principal dancer in pantomime at the Lyceum Theatre in the West End. In 1919, at the age of 21, she was appointed principal dancer of the Beecham Opera, which was then the resident opera company at the Royal Opera House.
In 1923, Valois joined the Ballets Russes, a renowned ballet company founded by the Russian impresario Sergei Diaghilev. Later in her life, Ninette de Valois claimed that everything she knew about how to run a ballet company she learned from working with Diaghilev.
After leaving the Ballets Russes, in 1927, Valois established the Academy of Choreographic Art, a dance school for girls in London and the Abbey Theatre School of Ballet, Dublin. When the Sadler's Wells theatre re-opened in 1931, Valois moved her school into studios there, under the new name, the Sadler's Wells Ballet School. A ballet company was also formed, known as the Vic-Wells Ballet. The Vic-Wells ballet company and school would be the predecessors of today's Royal Ballet, Birmingham Royal Ballet and Royal Ballet School.


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Re: Wicklow Roots

Post by keeper » Tue Apr 17, 2018 10:39 pm

Interesting posts Rocker, thanks for them !



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Re: Wicklow Roots

Post by Rocker » Sun Jan 06, 2019 11:27 am

now here is an interesting one Wicklow's very own Holly .... Hodgins Holly...read about it here,

http://www.countywicklowheritage.org/pa ... vNeC_KSCpY


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Re: Wicklow Roots

Post by Rocker » Sat Feb 09, 2019 12:26 am

When I first started doing the family history I had no idea where my maternal family came from. After years of sifting I found my Gt Grandfather came from Donard in Co Wicklow. I have been there many times and have failed to find leads on the family. They were probably just tenant farmers at one time. However, whenever I hear or read of anything associated with the place I read it. This is a great bit of info of an ogham stone there.

https://ogham.celt.dias.ie/stone.php?la ... D2HDEt3pJI


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Re: Wicklow Roots

Post by Sinead » Sat Feb 09, 2019 7:56 pm

Rocker, I can visit the grave of my Gr.Grandfather but can't find a death cert for him!

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Re: Wicklow Roots

Post by Rocker » Mon Feb 11, 2019 10:40 am

Sinead wrote:Rocker, I can visit the grave of my Gr.Grandfather but can't find a death cert for him!

Sinéad
Gosh Sinead, so much stuff and records were lost over the years scry


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Re: Wicklow Roots

Post by Rocker » Mon Feb 11, 2019 10:44 am

I follow a marvellous man on F/B he runs East West mapping and he produces the best maps for walkers. He also gives the history of various areas and this morning he posted a fascinating article.
"Mining for lead started at Luganure in 1809 and you can still find some of the old adits or mine entrances here. The passages followed the veins of lead and trended in a SSW direction through the mountain to Glendalough and also ENE towards the head of Glendasan.
These sketches here from the Pat Power collection show the extent of the mines and the names of the principal mining areas. Although Luganure was only one small part of the eventual enterprise, it lent its name to the district as a whole."

I will have to get the sketch reduced as the board will not let me post but it is fascinating to see just how many lead mines there were in the area....I counted at least 10 on the sketch map. Oh, if these places could talk!! I know that one branch of my family worked in various lead mines and probably in the early 1800 most of those family in Glendalough were probably involved in mining.


I learned how to resize maps so here is the map of Lugane

mines in Luganure resized.jpg
mines in Luganure resized.jpg (48.38 KiB) Viewed 642 times


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Re: Wicklow Roots

Post by Rocker » Fri Apr 05, 2019 10:08 am

new website in Greystones. Check it out for what to do and see....

https://greystones.ie/see-do/?fbclid=Iw ... M2ddtFfb7I


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Re: Wicklow Roots

Post by Rocker » Sun Sep 29, 2019 4:46 pm

While doing my family history I found the namesakes in Aurora, Old Boleys and Tonygarrow. It was poor uplands. The following from the Glencree Society gives good reading of the area.

History of Upper Glencree
Upper Glencree was a beautiful but inhospitable place 300 years ago and no-one lived there. Poor land, steep rocky terrain and forests of small oak trees covering all of the more fertile and sheltered parts of the valley which gave it its name – the Valley of Trees.
A rising population and the enclosing of large estates by ascendancy families – notably the Wingfield, or Powerscourt dynasty – compelled landless people to move further up the valleys to find subsistence. Trees were felled, small fields marked out and stones cleared from the land were fashioned into the familiar Wicklow dry-stone walls. Holdings were small – one or two fields per family, with shared mountain pasture and turf-cutting rights on a patch of peat bog. Townlands were identified with names like Ballyleron, Ballycoyle and Tonygarrow.
Later on, the Powerscourt family, whose estates included all of Glencree, caused 2 or 3-room cottages to be built for their tenant families, cobbled lanes and drainage ditches appeared and the population of the Upper Glen began to increase. Subsequently, a shooting lodge was built at Lough Bray and rudimentary roads linked the area with Enniskerry and the walled estate.
In 1858 the grim military barracks at the head of the valley was handed over to the Oblate Brothers who adapted it for use as an industrial school. For 82 years it was home to over 200 boys, the Oblate community and staff. The cluster of grey buildings were both a focal point and an economic centre for the people of Glencree. By that time, Land League reform had given families rights of tenure and many sought to improve their stock with out buildings for housing livestock.
With the foundation of the State, grants were offered to replace thatched roofs with slate or tile and soon the roads to Dublin and Enniskerry were tarred to accommodate the arrival of the motor car. The closure of the Reformatory in 1940 was a blow to the area in more ways than one. However, reaforestation began to change the landscape and provided some employment in the locality where hill-farming could no longer support the needs of a family.
Why Aurora ?
Most of the townland names are of Irish origin – Ballycoyle, Ballyleron, Cloon, Tonygarrow – but this area, west of the Glencree River and up to the head of the valley is named after a Roman goddess. Why? Legend has it that an earlier Lord of Powerscourt, returning perhaps, from a night of revelry in the infamous Hellfire Club, halted his carriage at the top of Glencree, just as the summer sunrise broke above the hills at Barnamire and illuminated that one triangle of dark hillside. He was so overcome by the beauty of it all that he decided to name this corner of his vast estate “ Aurora “ – ancient Roman goddess of the dawn.
Across the river from Aurora is the townland of Old Boleys. A boley was a summer pasture and this part of Glencree, south facing, with deeper soil and better grass than rugged Aurora, is where drovers brought his Lordships cattle every year for their summer quarters.

Where did the Glencree Society come in?

In 1967 a group of youth clubs based in DunLaoghaire borough and Dublin city were renting a farm cottage, known locally as ‘The Grove’, and 60 acres of mostly mountain land at Aurora. Through a committee they shared the responsibility of upkeep and took turns to organise weekend trips to Glencree for their young members. In the summer of that year their short lease expired and the opportunity arose to buy the property. Although it had no money, the group agreed to do so, but they won the support of two very resourceful people – the late Denis Aldridge from Sandycove and the late Fr. Frank McCabe, founder of St.Joseph’s Boys’ AFC in Sallynoggin. The Glencree Society was formed, trustees were appointed and enough finance was found to provide the building which now houses the bedrooms and recreation hall, as well as the purchase price. Oil lamps gave way to electricity and flush toilets made their first appearance.
Denis Aldridge became the Society’s first chairman and served in that role for 13 years.

The Grove
Just a few years before the first of the youth clubs ventured up to Glencree, The Grove was a working farm, owned by the McGuirk family. It got its name from the shelter belt of trees behind the house – a feature in the landscape where reaforestation had not yet arrived. A stone outbuilding housed a horse and two cows, the enclosed yard was cobbled and pigs were kept outside the perimeter wall. There was a vegetable garden, turf was stacked against the back gable wall and the haggard behind the cottage had a stand on four upright granite columns which kept the winter fodder dry and free from vermin. Hens ranged freely and the flat ‘henstone’ still visible in facing the door was their feeding point.
The house was small but dry and warm. The kitchen, with earthen floor, was where the family lived, cooked and ate and with a small bedroom on either side. (At some point a dairy was built on – now serving as the Grove’s kitchen) There was no electricity, running water or sanitation. Furniture was simple and sparse – a table, a bench, some stools and a settle, which doubled as a bed for children at night. All cooking and baking was done over the open fire. An iron kettle always hung on the crane and the fire never actually went out – banked up at night and rekindled in the morning.

Lough Bray House
Was built as a shooting lodge for the Powerscourt estate towards the end of the 19th century. Later it was bought by the Guinness family and in the last 50 years changed hands several times as a private residence. Sited on the south facing shore of Lower Lough Bray, it can only be seen from the opposite side – from the ridge-top path that leads to the Eagle’s Crag. There was the Lodge itself, the gamekeeper’s house and, out at the roadside, a gatelodge, believed to be the highest inhabited house in Ireland. Later known as ‘McGuirk’s of Lough Bray’, J.M.Synge stayed there and was said to have been inspired to write The Shadow of the Glen as a result. A beach up at the lakeside was created by hauling cartloads of sand from Brittas Bay.
Lough Bray Upper and Lower are corrie lakes, gouged out by the retreating ice-age, brooding and beautiful but extremely deep and dangerous. The stream which drains he lower lake rushes across the valley to join the Glencree River and was the source of fresh water for both The Grove and Aurora House before wells were drilled.

Who was Major Thunder?
Pat Thunder was a genial Irish gentleman who entered the British army during World War Two. Demobbed about 1950 and – like many others since – captivated by Glencree, he bought the 2-storey house at the end of the lane, with its surrounding land. He grew his own vegetables, acquired a rotovater, hiring himself out to farmers in the Glen and at weekends, made his house available as an overflow for the An Oige hostel in the village.
The venue soon developed a sort of cult status – in a village without a pub – and many regular weekenders headed straight for ‘Thunder’s’, leaving the hostel to the hikers. But it wasn’t a very lucrative project and as time went by and money ran out, creditors were pressing and the Major decided to call time. Leaving no forwarding address, he entrusted his house to a couple of dubious friends who soon lost interest, and Aurora House fell into disrepair.
To a generation of youngsters staying at The Grove in those pre-electricity days, ‘Captain’ Thunder who had disappeared so mysteriously, became a scary ghost that haunted the dark ruined house at the end of the equally dark lane. But in 1970 he reappeared. Retired from a teaching post in England, he returned to claim his property. He was horrified to find a stark, roofless shell, stripped of every scrap of timber, where cattle sheltered from the elements.
The outbuilding still had a roof and in November of that year he moved into it, with a plastic window bottled gas cooker, heater and lamp, a pile of books and a cat, and when the weather was fine, he worked at cleaning up the ruined house in preparation for the builder who would come in the spring. The house was duly rebuilt, Mr.Thunder planted trees and shrubs, built a mini swimming pool and restocked his vegetable garden. The old pals were all gone, but he was content to live quietly for seven years until failing health and harsh winters persuaded him to sell up and move to Bray. He offered The Glencree Society first refusal. The Society accepted and in 1977 Aurora House became part of its outward bound location. After a few years the present kitchen was added and new showers and toilets were installed.


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Re: Wicklow Roots

Post by Sinead » Sun Sep 29, 2019 5:13 pm

Rocker, you find the most interesting bits of reading, this is fantastic. When I was in the Tech in Dun Laoghaire Fr. McCabe was the Chaplain to the boys, the girls had Fr. Canning



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